Posts

Can we email an amortization report to each borrower when interest rates change?

Margill Loan Manager – Can we email an amortization report to each borrower when interest rates change?

Yes this can be done.

First, I guess you updated the interest rates though the Main window with Ctrl Alt Shift i. Ideally you have a custom field that identifies the loans that are tied to the specific index (Prime, LIBOR, etc.). With this field you can easily select the proper loans to 1) change the interest rates quickly and 2) send the amortization schedule by email.

You could have the scroll menu with “Prime” or to be more precise “Prime +”

To create the statement to send out, go to Reports > Mail/Email Template > New and create a DocX that offers many more options than the older RTF.

You can then structure the template and enter your logo and add the Merge codes to identify the Borrower, etc. You could also create your statement in Word and copy it here afterwards.

Here is what this could look like (the |105| for example, are Merge fields)…

The merge codes to enter the amortization schedule per se are under the General theme. You can try each to see which is best for you. There are 10 templates and we can program others to meet you exact needs (columns included, titles, etc.).

 

Now that your template is created, test to see if all is good (numbers, names, etc.).

Go to Reports > Document Merge.

You will need to select a date range or show the entire schedule (past, present and future payments). I would opt for a date range to see up to the rate change, not the future.

See the circled red settings below. |991| will be the schedule…

Then press on “Save – Print -Send by Email”.

Here are the options:

You can also add an email  Subject and Message when sending the email.

Email sending must be configured in Tools > Settings > Email Connection. Your IT person will usually set this up properly for each Margill user.

The selected Records will all be sent out by email in a batch. Each takes about 10 seconds to create and send out.

Long first payment deferral versus normal one period (month) deferral

Question:

When we compare a loan using a normal amortization schedule (amortization book or calculation on an online website) we do not reach the same number of payments in Margill as in the on-line calculator. Why is this?

Here is an example:

Origination Date:  July 14, 2017.
Original Principal: $ 11,374.
10% interest rate
48 months
Deferred interest and payments until Feb. 15 2018.

Normal amortization tables show payment of approx. $288.00 @ 48 months.
Margill is showing us 51 + payments @ $288.00.

Answer:

This is a most common error because of the “Deferred payment.”

Amortization tables (static) and on-line calculators cannot include deferred payments. They are usually exactly one period (often one month) after the Origination date. You could not thus get the proper payment with a 7 month deferral.

If I do a 48-month loan, with first payment exactly one month after July 14, I thus get the $288 you are looking for ($288.86 to be precise). Leave the payment blank so it is calculated.

So this is not what you are looking for since my first payment date is not properly deferred.

Let’s say we really do want 48 payments with the February date.

Because of the deferred first payment (6 months after a normal 1 month deferral) I am now at a payment of 303.81. Much higher since more interest accrued before any principal gets repaid.

From the screenshots you sent me, you want a 288.00 payment (not 288.86):

So I leave the the Amortization and Term blank and the number of payments will be computed to 52 with a last payment of $82.76.

 

Follow up question:

When I wrote “Deferred interest and payments” I meant thee is no interest from July 2017 to February 2018.

Follow-up answer:

You can simply change the Rate column to 0.00%. Balance then becomes minus $1047.44.

Then delete the extra lines (for which the balance is now negative) by highlighting them > right click with the mouse.

 We are now at 47 payments of $288.00 and the last one at $204.61 (since no interest for 7 months).